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Great Britain problem gambling rate stable as participation declines


The Gambling Commission’s Health Survey shows the rate of problem gambling across Great Britain in 2016 remained at a consistent rate.

Data from the Commission’s Health Survey was compiled by NatCen Social Research in 2016.

Field research revealed 0.7% of Britons were classed as problem gamblers, with 2.4% deemed low-risk gamblers, and 1.1% labelled moderate risk gamblers.

Tim Miller, Executive Director at the Gambling Commission, said: “The Health Survey, along with all of our evidence and data, indicates that the problem gambling rate in Great Britain is stable.

“However, we want to see a sustained and significant reduction in the levels of problem gambling and will continue to drive the industry to build momentum towards this goal.”

The Gambling Commission will use the survey’s findings alongside its recently published ‘Research programme 2018-2020’ to inform the next Responsible Gambling Strategy, launching in April 2019.

A total of 57% of adults surveyed had participated in some form of gambling over the past 12 months, down from 63% in 2015, and 65% in 2012.

The number of gambling participants fell to 42% when excluding National lottery draws, with only 9% gambling online during the year.

Men are still more likely to gamble in Britain than women, with 62% participating compared to 52% of women.

The National Lottery draws remain the most popular gambling activity, with a 41% participation rate, followed by 21% for scratchcards, and 14% for other lotteries.

The draws were the most popular activity for all age groups, except 16-24 year-olds, who favoured scratchcards.

Excluding National Lottery Draw participants, gambling participation was highest among “younger adults’ and lowest for those over the age of 65.